Dr. Pediatrician/Mom

Posts for tag: Chicken Pox

By ABC PEDIATRICS
October 28, 2020
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Chicken Pox  
Your Child and Chicken PoxYou just got the call from your child’s school: someone in your kid’s class has chickenpox. This highly contagious virus isn’t usually anything to worry about, but it can certainly cause some very unpleasant symptoms for your child, including a terribly red and itchy rash all over the body and face. If you’re concerned about chickenpox, your pediatrician can tell you everything that you should know about this common childhood infection.


How can I tell that it’s chickenpox?

Since chickenpox is caused by a viral infection, most children will develop common symptoms of an infection before the rash even develops. These symptoms include:
  • Sore throat
  • Fever
  • Stomach upset
  • Headache
  • Body aches
  • Loss of appetite
The rash will usually appear 1-2 days after your child has been exposed to chickenpox. This rash consists of itchy, fluid-filled blisters that crust over within 4-5 days. Some children may only develop a few blisters on their body while others may develop hundreds.


How is chickenpox treated?

It is incredibly important that you keep your child from scratching the rash, as this can lead to infection and make their symptoms worse. Several home remedies can ease discomfort and itching. Some of these include:
  • Applying calamine lotion
  • Making sure that your child is drinking enough water and staying hydrated
  • Soaking in a bath with baking soda for 20-30 minutes to reduce inflammation and pain
  • Applying cold compresses to the rash
  • Taking an over-the-counter antihistamine (talk with your pediatric doctor first before giving your child any medication)
Should my child see a doctor?

If your child is experiencing the typical symptoms of chickenpox, then chances are good that you won’t have to bring them into the office. The only thing you can do is wait. You should call your pediatrician if:
  • Your newborn is showing signs of chickenpox
  • Your child’s fever goes away and then comes back
  • Your child has a high fever
  • Some areas of the rash are getting larger or are painful (signs of infection)
Is there a way to prevent chickenpox?

The good news is that children today can be protected against chickenpox with a simple vaccine. The chickenpox vaccine is administered in two doses: the first vaccine is administered when your baby is 12 to 15 months and a second vaccine is administered at 4-6 years old.

If you want to protect your child against the chickenpox, then talk to your pediatrician about getting them vaccinated. Your child has enough to worry about, without chickenpox being one of them.
By ABC PEDIATRICS
March 26, 2019
Category: Child Health
Tags: Immunizations   Vaccines   Measles   Polio   Chicken Pox  

Has your child gotten his or her shots? "Shots" is the out-dated term for childhood immunizations, or vaccines. These medications are injected into the muscle at prescribed doses and intervals to help the immune system produce antibodies to shield against communicable diseases. At ABC Pediatrics in McKinney, your team of four doctors stress how important these child immunizations are in keeping your Child Immunizationfamily healthy for life.

Why are child immunizations important?

Immunizations help control the spread of communicable diseases, such as measles and the flu. These diseases by themselves cause harmful symptoms and potentially catastrophic side effects, and even death. When they spread unchecked throughout a population, such as a school, daycare or neighborhood, they do considerable harm to people with weakened immune systems, the elderly and others who cannot receive vaccines because of medical limitations.

The concept of immunizing as many people as possible, and protecting the medically weak, is called herd immunity. Also known as community immunity, herd immunity helps reduce or eliminate diseases from a population.

According to the US Department of Health & Human Services, pneumococcal infections are a great example of how effective herd immunity can be. The occurrence of this disease has decreased drastically since children have begun receiving pneumonia shots.

The child immunization schedules in McKinney

In all, your child be protected against 18 communicable diseases by the time he or she reaches the age of 18. ABC Pediatrics follows the immunization schedule published by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Schedules cover ages 0 to age 6, ages 7 through 18, and also include a catch-up schedule for children who have started late or were interrupted by illness or other circumstance.

Included in the schedules are diseases such as:

  • Measles
  • Hepatitis
  • Pneumonia
  • Rotavirus
  • Tetanus
  • Meningitis
  • Polio
  • Chicken pox
  • Mumps

At ABC Pediatrics, your child's physician will keep track of his or her vaccines and distribute documentation to schools, sports teams, day care and other organizations as needed. Also, the CDC provides parents with an immunization tracker tool on its website so you know what vaccine is administered and when.

Reactions to vaccines

ABC Pediatrics maintains that vaccines are safe and effective in protecting your child against the harmful communicable diseases. Many vaccines cause no localized reaction at all, while some may make your child run a low grade fever or make his or her arm tender and warm.

Contact us

We'll be happy to answer any questions you have regarding child immunizations. To schedule your next well-child visit, phone ABC Pediatrics in McKinney, TX, at (972) 569-9904.